Final Girls Berlin Film Festival Movie Review: WOMEN WHO KILL

I could keep this review short and sweet by simply stating that WOMEN WHO KILL is, in layman's terms, fucking fantastic. Ingrid Jungermann is currently my favorite person in the world, and her film is equally incredible. A two-sentence movie review isn't exactly professional however, and a film of this expertly-crafted caliber deserves every ounce of professionalism I have to offer (which isn't much, but hell, I can try). 

Written, directed, and starring Ingrid Jungermann, WOMEN WHO KILL follows Morgan (Jungermann), who is afraid of commitment, and her ex-girlfriend Jean (Ann Carr), as they run a locally famous podcast about female serial killers. When Morgan begins to suspect that her new lover, Simone (Sheila Vand), is a serial killer herself, her life begins to unravel as she's faced with her fear of commitment and the potential danger she's found herself in. 

Claiming WOMEN WHO KILL to be flawless may seem bold, but it's nothing short of the truth. Jungermann's script and direction are the very definition of perfection, with the writer/director masterfully blending genres in a way that feels true to each one it dabbles in. The humor in the film is subtle and intentionally awkward, and Jungermann executes the laughs in a way that never betrays the tension and underlying mystery of the story. Her direction is confident and precise, framing shots that lend a specific humor and uneasiness to the film's tone, all the while sustaining a pace that never feels breakneck or slow. 

The performances of WOMEN WHO KILL are great across the board as well, with Jungermann, Carr, Vand and Annette O'Toole standing out as highlights. Jungermann shines as Morgan, perfectly capturing the awkward humor of the character and realizing her flaws in a way that feels true to life. Carr and Vand are equally stellar opposite of Jungermann, with each character inspiring Morgan in different ways. O'Toole, though not appearing often, chews her scenes and guides her imprisoned serial killer to uncomfortable heights of loneliness and lunacy. 

I came out of WOMEN WHO KILL entirely blown away by the film I'd just experienced. Jungermann's flick pulls off a tricky balancing act by expertly blending genres that would be conflicting in the hands of a less talented filmmaker, and the end result is an unforgettable modern masterpiece of comedy, suspense, and the exploration of the common fear of commitment. Don't miss it. 

Curt Oglesbee