LA Film Festival Movie Review: NEVER HERE

NEVER HERE, a film directed by Camille Thoman, is a beautiful fusion of film noir and art house thrillers. The film is about Miranda Fall (Mireille Enos), an artist who photographs strangers, but after some violence incidents in her neighborhood, she begins to believe she is being watched. 

The police investigate an attack that occurs outside Miranda's window and she pretends that she is the one who witnessed it, mimicking the actual witness's words and phrasing, which repeats throughout the film. During the investigation, Miranda takes it upon herself to conduct her own investigation that doubles as her next art project. 

NEVER HERE is a heavy hitter when it comes to symbolism, complete with neon signs pointing out reality and imagination. As the investigation continues, Miranda loses her grasp on reality, which is skillfully displayed through performance art and photographs. 

As Thoman's directorial debut in a narrative feature film, NEVER HERE is an effort to not be ignored. The cinematography is artful and the acting, particularly by Enos, is spot on. The story, however, leaves a little bit to be desired. Because the film is so heavy on symbolism and artfulness, the storyline seems to be an afterthought at times. However, it is definitely a film that requires a repeat viewing and some thought before everything is understood. 

Kino McFarland