Comic Book Review: SPEAK NO EVIL: ISSUE #1 & #2

Comic Book Review: SPEAK NO EVIL: ISSUE #1 & #2

SPEAK NO EVIL is a comic series about a pair of enterprising brothers who happen to stumble upon an old cabin once used by H.P. Lovecraft and Nikola Tesla for twisted experiments into worlds beyond our own. What they think is a quick payday turns out to be a disaster for the world around them, but excellent reading for us. 

Book Review: DEAD OVER HEELS

Book Review: DEAD OVER HEELS

I started DEAD OVER HEELS excited for a good paranormal story. Few things touch my happy reader buttons like things witchy and creepy. The title and cover absolutely sizzle but unfortunately, as I read, I was disappointed. 

Book Review: Film FestEvil

Book Review: Film FestEvil

Today I will be reviewing the horror/thriller book FILM FESTEVIL by Terry Cronin and Steven Shea. To best describe the story, I will use my own plot summary: 

"A film obsessed psychopath escapes from a mental institution hoping to make a splash at a nearby film festival.  As bodies begin to drop, it is up to the employees of the festival to combat the killer who is planning to end things in grand fashion on Oscar's night."

Book Review: NIGHTMARE SOUP

Book Review: NIGHTMARE SOUP

Hello again, ghosts and ghouls!  I'm here to talk about something incredibly nostalgic.  There are a few things that I associate with my horror-filled childhood, such as the book I used to take out of the library every week simply titled "Horror Movies", the time I slept over my best friend's house at 12 years old and we watched THE EXORCIST even though I told my mom we wouldn't, and last but not least, "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark."

Comic Review: Evil Dead 2 - Beyond Dead by Dawn

Comic Review: Evil Dead 2 - Beyond Dead by Dawn

Welcome witches and warlocks,

Today I will be reviewing the graphic novel EVIL DEAD 2: BEYOND DEAD BY DAWN written by Frank Hannah and illustrated by Barnaby Bagenda, Oscar Bazulda, and Edgar Salazar.  Before we dive into the review proper, allow me to present a brief synopsis taken from the press materials:

Book Review: Mike Robinson's THE GREEN-EYED MONSTER

Book Review: Mike Robinson's THE GREEN-EYED MONSTER

I'm always on the search for new books to read, especially when it comes to horror.  I like books that completely absorb me entirely and take me out of my reality only to place me somewhere completely different.  It's rare to find a story that makes you forget about all your surroundings, but I found myself immersed in the surroundings that author Mike Robinson created with his book "The Green-Eyed Monster."

Book Review: Beryl Evans' CHARLIE THE CHOO-CHOO

Book Review: Beryl Evans' CHARLIE THE CHOO-CHOO

I love when children's books leave you with a feeling of uneasiness and discomfort.  I mean, they are supposed to be lighthearted and cheerful, and for the most part they are.  However, sometimes you come across one that just doesn't seem all there, and though you may not be able to put your finger on it, you know deep down that there is something inherently wrong with the book you are reading.  That was my experience when reading the children's book CHARLIE THE CHOO-CHOO, and though it may seem like I didn't enjoy my experience, I assure you, I did.  For those of you who are Stephen King fans, you may recognize this book from King's "Dark Tower" series, which may explain why this book isn't your average "Blue's Clues" type of story.

Book Review: Satanic Panic: Pop-Cultural Paranoia in the 1980s

Book Review: Satanic Panic: Pop-Cultural Paranoia in the 1980s

As technology moved forward, parents began to leave child-rearing to the TV, the far right bible thumpers started their war against The Devil and nobody was safe; not your Saturday morning cartoons; not new technology in the form of 976 and 900 phone numbers or computers; not rich kid drug dealers; not heavy metal musicians; and certainly not Satanists themselves. 

Book Review: Jeremy Megargee's OLD HOLLOW

Book Review: Jeremy Megargee's OLD HOLLOW

Hello again, ghosts and ghouls!  I know, it's been forever since I've had a chance to talk to you all about the awesome things going on in the horror world right now.  Between wedding planning and puppy training (and a full time job), horror somehow took the back burner.  That doesn't make me happy. 

What DOES make me happy is when I am gifted a copy of a book by one of my favorite horror authors that I get to read on my lunch break!  Who might that be, you ask?  It's someone you all know and love because I review his stuff every single time I can get my hands on it...the ineffable Jeremy Megargee!

Book Review: Josh Hancock's "The Girls of October"

Book Review:  Josh Hancock's "The Girls of October"

With any form of entertainment I delve into, whether it be a TV show, movie, or a book, I almost always figure out the culprit much too soon, and find frustration with those that don't see it. When I watched SAW in the theatre, I spent the entire movie yelling "CHECK THE BODY"...my friends were so mad that I just knew... 

Cut to now, reading THE GIRLS OF OCTOBER by Josh Hancock - the style of writing, much like Bram Stoker's DRACULA, is told in the form of news snippets, police reports, interviews, print articles, and in an ode to modern media 'The National Buzz'; and I never figured it out.  Well played, Josh, well played. 

Craig Reviews Stephen Kozeniewski's novel "Braineater Jones"

Craig Reviews Stephen Kozeniewski's novel "Braineater Jones"

Welcome witches and warlocks,

Today I will be reviewing the zombie themed novel Braineater Jones (2013) by Stephen Kozeniewski.  For a description I will turn to the author who described the book as:

"Braineater Jones wakes up face down in a swimming pool with no memory of his former life, how he died, or why he's now a zombie.  With a smart-aleck severed head as a partner, Jones descends into a gritty, Prohibition-era urban jungle to solve his own murder." 

Nikki VonFrankenstitch Reviews the Horror Novel "Dollmaker" by Justin Robinson

Nikki VonFrankenstitch Reviews the Horror Novel "Dollmaker" by Justin Robinson

Sometimes a fetish can go too far…

Let me go on record saying I didn’t hate this book, but I’m still trying to wrap my brain around it as I’m not sure if I like it or what… 

Dollmaker is about Stephen.  A man who fetishized the perfect woman, a ballerina, from a poster; posters are one dimensional, thus, so was Stephens perfect woman.  Smart, iconoclast, Stephen went about the alchemical arts to create his ultimate concubine…and then another…and another.  Each woman he created took something of him, from him.  Stephen isn’t a bad guy, he’s quite talented, his moral center is questionable, but he’s not a villain… he’s the anti-hero.  

The Creeping Craig Reviews "Identity Thief"

The Creeping Craig Reviews "Identity Thief"

Hello horror hounds,

Tonight I will be reviewing a graphic novel called “Identity Thief” by Bryant Dillon and Meaghan O'Keefe.  From the description: “When Daphne and Craig move into a new apartment, they have every reason to believe that they have left their troubled past behind them.  Everything seems perfect, but after the discovery of a mysterious hatch in his closet, Craig begins to realize that something disturbingly inhuman is seeking a way into his home, desperate to enter his life in the most intimate and unsettling way possible.”

Taylor Terrible Reviews "Burnt Scrolls" by Jeremy Megargee

Taylor Terrible Reviews "Burnt Scrolls" by Jeremy Megargee

Over the past year, I’ve had the pleasure of coming in contact with some really incredible people in horror. I won a giveaway and met Zach Bohannon who is now one of my good friends, and through him, I was put in touch with Shannon of Nightmarish Conjurings. Afterwards, I followed someone on Instagram, and it turns out he’s a really,

really

amazing writer…Mr. Jeremy Megargee.

Shannon Reviews "Fearworms: Selected Poems by Robert Payne Cabeen"

Shannon Reviews "Fearworms: Selected Poems by Robert Payne Cabeen"

Good horror books/poems/graphic novels are hard to come by.  I always feel like I’m constantly searching for quality stories that don’t leave me bored or unsatisfied.  As of late, I’ve run into a few really great books by authors Zach Bohannon and Jeremy Megargee but I needed more to whet my appetite. While attending ScareLA, I saw a booth that happened to be selling an awesome HP Lovecraft art piece.  I ended up not buying the piece but I struck up a conversation with Barbra and Bryant Dillon of Fanboy Comics.  They informed me that if I liked horror poems such as “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark,” I should read “Fearworms” by Robert Payne Cabeen.  I looked quickly at the book that they published, fell in love with the illustrations and was instantly curious as to what these poems would have in store for me.  After that, the rest was history. I finished reading “Fearworms” last night and I was absolutely giddy with excitement, it was that good! 

Taylor Terribe Reviews Dirt Lullabies by Jeremy Megargee

Taylor Terribe Reviews Dirt Lullabies by Jeremy Megargee

Hello again, my creepy crawlies,

I had the privilege of reading the first novel by indie horror author Jeremy Megargee, Dirt Lullabies.  Honestly, the opportunity came about in a pretty cool way…we’ve been following each other on Instagram for some time, when suddenly, a message appeared! Jeremy asked me to read Dirt Lullabies and I agreed, hence where we are now! Little did I know that I would consider Jeremy to be one of my favorite horror writers…

Empty Bodies: Adaptation by Zach Bohannon

Empty Bodies: Adaptation by Zach Bohannon

A while back I wrote a post on my own personal blog reviewing Zach Bohannon’s first book in the Empty Bodies series (you can find it here:http://terribletoychest.blogspot.com/2015/02/empty-bodies-review-of-new-novel.html) Well today, friends, I have the pleasure of letting you know that he’s released the second book: Adaptation!  Not only is Zach an incredible friend, he’s an awesome storyteller and writer. I’ve had so much fun getting to know him and his writing, and I’ve also had the privilege of seeing these stories develop.

The Wolfen by Whitley Strieber

The Wolfen by Whitley Strieber

SYNOPSIS OF “THE WOLFEN” FROM WIKIPEDIA:

The Wolfen (1978) is the debut novel of Whitley Strieber.  It tells the story of two police detectives in New York City who are involved in the investigation of suspicious deaths across the city, which are revealed to be the work of a race of intelligent beings descended from wolves, called the Wolfen.  The novel is told from the point of view of the human characters as well from the Wolfen themselves." 

We All Float Down Here - A Review of Stephen King's "IT"

We All Float Down Here - A Review of Stephen King's "IT"

Stephen King.  Oh, Stephen King.  Only you would write a novel about a clown.  Actually, only you would write a 1,000+ page novel about a clown.  

Before I get into my review on this book, I want to back up and begin by explaining that I hate clowns.  I fear clowns.  There is nothing that makes me happy about a clown.  My fear of clowns started at a young age, when I decided to be rebellious and watch “Killer Klowns from Outer Space” by myself.  Ever since then, clowns have been the bane of my existence.  I’m sure you are wondering why I would want to read a book dedicated to a clown - well I figured it was time to face my fears.  

The Exorcist (1971 Novel)

The Exorcist (1971 Novel)

If anyone knows me they know that I have a top three “holy trinity” of horror movies.  Those three movies would be: The Exorcist, The Thing, and Poltergeist - in that order… meaning The Exorcist is my all time favorite horror movie.  When I made the decision to read The Exorcist, two weeks ago, I wasn’t filled with much hope due to the fact that the movie is just SO good.  I’m happy to report that the book is just as good.