Bullying is a facet of life that ignites a deep resonation in my psyche. I feel as though you’d be hard pressed to find someone who hasn’t fallen victim to it as some point or another, and I am certainly no exception. Social media began gaining momentum when I was in elementary school. I felt the brunt of not only cyberbullying before it was well understood but physical bullying as well. School became a nightmare for me – You want real-life horror? For me, it was a group of girls who found solace in making my life a personal hell.

This is precisely why I was initially drawn to HERE THERE BE MONSTERS – The synopsis describing the unfortunate circumstances a young, bullied girl finds herself in after awakening in an empty bus yard after accidentally falling asleep on her journey home.

Though entirely dialogue-free, I felt more from this short film than I have from any other artistic medium in a long time. I related to the main character immediately – Her inaction against those tormenting her. I had been there, we all have, and some of us stay stuck in that unless that defining moment comes to changes us forever. Sure, on the surface here change comes in the form of some gnarly monster stalking a bus yard after dusk, but I can’t help but feel this all to be largely metaphorical.

I’ve been known to frequently mention that a major reason why I’m so deeply fond of this genre is due to its innate ability to provide social commentary in an unassuming way. Such subtleties speak volumes and engage the viewers in a way that is more deeply profound because it brings upon a recollection of personal histories in order to interpret them.

That being said, HERE THERE BE MONSTERS not only delivers a beyond satisfactory creature (using practical effects, no less!) but an important message about overcoming your obstacles and standing your ground.

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Breanna Whipple

Breanna is a freelance writer with an undying love for horror and heavy metal. Growing up in an isolated city in Northern Alberta, Canada, much of her childhood was spent planted before a tv screen consuming the works of John Carpenter and Wes Craven. Fascinated by things that frightened her since viewing The Exorcist at the ripe age of five years old, she became hell-bent on viewing as many movies possible — A habit that would follow her through maturation.
Breanna Whipple
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