With the recent release of Blumhouse’s anxiety-inducing horror film CAM dropping on Netflix back in November, this movie’s rapidly growing popularity appears to be taking genre fans by storm (myself included). Housing many great elements that make up the perfect modern thriller that contains a very unique premise, one that stands out in particular would be Gavin Brivik’s complex score. His musical approach guides you through the traumatic twists and turns of online cam girl Alice’s life, and what happens when she attempts to reach her goal of having the number one status.

Taking precedent as one of my favorite film scores this past year, Brivik’s haunting contribution flows with the film and transforms along with the story’s progression. Starting off as very peppy and electronically fun, the score travels through entrancing synthesizers that move alongside Lola’s colorful home decor, while gradually turning more frightful as tensions rise. We hear such a smooth transition from modernly energetic, to almost faint, dark industrial sounds to imply the height of the plot’s dread. The score’s almost frantic and hyper nature matches Alice’s personality, which evolves when her life takes a foreboding turn through the use of lonesome echoing bells that toll in the distance, but then comes full circle ending with more electronic pep for the finale.

What’s also great about this score is its incorporation of many different sounds and styles. It is very electronic, primarily synth-driven, but also showcases the dreadful sound of tolling bells (as previously mentioned), along with the rich and timbre addition of woodwinds, keeping it high-energy, but also light and airy. The shift from electronic to seemingly live instruments offers a unique approach towards score composition within this genre, as many present scores tend to focus just on the sound of synthesizers. With all these styles combined, it allows the score to rise and fall where it needs to, keeping the audience intrigued and allowing great insight towards the very technologically driven era we live in.

Every aspect within this film completes each other and works together, forming a colorful, yet sinister space that is transformed through Brivik’s score and Michael Bucuzzo’s sound design. When one element does not align with the other, a film can visually and musically fall apart, with those missing pieces acting as a huge distraction, but CAM showcases none of that. Each cog is perfectly matched and keeps the film running smoothly from start to finish. Every sound will entrance you, with the beautiful visuals pulling you along for the ride, giving you a little musical taste that’s both fun, yet gritty. Be sure to check out CAM and its brilliant score on Netflix today.

To purchase the original soundtrack to CAM, click HERE.

Abigail Braman
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Abigail Braman

Abigail is a macabre and horror artist, primarily working in oil paints and found objects, and does freelance writing for both Nightmarish Conjurings and Pophorror. She loves all-things horror, animation, and art history, and is currently working on her first dark stop-motion animated horror short film, Cadillac Dust. Abigail is also very passionate about music, having used to play the banjo, guitar, and sing in a band called The Killer Pines. When she's not either painting, writing, working, or watching movies while doing all of these things, she's probably sleeping, or cuddling with Claude the cat (or both).
Abigail Braman
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Music Review

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